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A Taste of New Orleans in NoHo

A Taste of New Orleans in NoHo


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NoHo’s Acme Bar & Grillserves a legit Fried Shrimp Po’Boy that even discerning Louisiana expats can stand behind. It may not be Mother’s, but Acme’s sandwich hits the mark with tender, cornmeal-crusted shrimp amply stuffed in a soft, crusty baguette.

The Po’Boy is served un-sauced, but it comes with a lemon wedge and sides of tangy cocktail sauce and creamy remoulade. Surprisingly, it doesn’t really need any add-ons, but a squirt of lemon juice and a dab of remoulade only improve the experience. You get your choice of one side— go with the cinnamon-dusted sweet potato fries, which have a dessert-like quality to them.

You can also make like you’re at Pat O’Brien’s on Bourbon Street by ordering a pitcher of Hurricanes. This rum and passion juice-based concoction may look pink and girlie, but it’ll knock you on your ass if you’re not careful.


These mini lamb burgers from Chef Klaus Happel of Soif Faim at Hotel Intercontinental won a Fleur De Lis Best of Show-Savory award at the 2011 New Orleans Wine & Food Experience. Chef Happel serves the burgers with crisp eggplant fries and tzatziki sauce for dipping.

This is a quintessentially New Orleans preparation of a Gulf seafood favorite, from Chef Gerry Middleton of Galatoire's. The snapper fillets are seared and served in a white wine sauce with sautéed artichokes, carrots, shallots, and mushrooms.


Taste of a Place: Leah Chase's Butter Cake

Associate Editor's Note: The loss of legendary chef, civil rights activist and Southerner Leah Chase cannot truly be quantified. Over the span of 96 years, Mrs. Chase taught us all what it meant to be more than just a good cook or great chef, but what food can do to bridge communities and foster change. While we will all miss Mrs. Chase, her contributions—not only to the food world but to advancing the greater human experience—will live on forever. With that, I'd like to take a moment to republish one of my favorite recipes of Leah Chase—her famous butter cake. This quintessentially Southern recipe knows no equal. Made with humble ingredients, Chase's cake takes the ordinary and transforms it into something that tastes like home.

While recently testing recipes for my book, American Cake, I remembered a pound cake — a butter cake, specifically — and a special conversation with a special lady. It made me wonder how something so simple could stay with someone, and bring back to them a rush of memories some 80 years later.

So I baked that cake, and my kitchen was filled with the most intoxicating aroma. That cake emerged from the oven grand and beautiful, and it tested your patience to leave it alone and let it cool before slicing. I thought how difficult that must have been for Leah Chase, known as the "Queen of Creole Cuisine," growing up in a small home in Madisonville, with her 10 other siblings hungrily wanting a slice!

I met Leah Chase in the kitchen of Dooky Chase's Restaurant in New Orleans' seventh ward about three years ago. A longtime friend of mine named Judy Walker, who had written about food for years for the Times-Picayune, knew I had just enough time in New Orleans for one meal. In Judy's mind that meal had to be at Mrs. Chase's restaurant because her fried chicken had been voted the best in the city. And also because of the gumbo, stewed okra, red beans and rice, collard greens, peach cobbler and pretty much anything on the buffet that day. That meal is still on my mind, and so is the one-of-a-kind Mrs. Chase. She was married to jazz musician Dooky Chase, who died just this past November. And it was Dooky's parents who started the restaurant on Orleans Avenue in 1941.

She grew up on a farm during the Depression in a town called Madisonville, about 40 miles north of New Orleans. Straight across Lake Pontchartrain, Madisonville was so-named after President James Madison. It is known for fishing and for strawberries, and here Leah Chase learned the merits of economy, family, and simplicity.

She was one of 11 children, and her job as a child was to keep the house clean. When she moved to New Orleans as a young woman, after being educated in Catholic schools, she sought out work in a restaurant kitchen. She says her family didn't approve of this type of work for her: A job as a seamstress was far more respectable than being in a kitchen. And yet, this was where her heart was. Mrs. Chase was influenced by the city’s Spanish and French cooking, and when combined with the Southern food she knew so well, her distinctive Creole cooking style was born.

Mrs. Chase took over the kitchen at Dooky Chase's more than 50 years ago and elevated the restaurant's home-style fare into a Creole cuisine that dignitaries, celebrities, tourists, and locals line up for on regular and special days, celebrating birthdays, baptisms and weddings, and even mourning after funerals. Some of the people who've patronized the restaurant include Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush, Ray Charles, Duke Ellington and many others. When 1960s racial tensions unsettled New Orleans and the South, Mrs. Chase practiced culinary diplomacy, bringing blacks and whites shoulder-to-shoulder at the table to share fried chicken and greens.

When I walked into the kitchen, Mrs. Chase – no taller than 5 feet but a formidable force in spite of her diminutive size – was inspecting each piece of fried chicken her niece Cleo Robinson was pulling from the fryer. Mrs. Chase knows how to listen to fried chicken as it cooks. She learned to cook with all her senses, fully appreciating the art of it. When it stops spattering in the grease and is quiet, that means the chicken is done.

I asked Mrs. Chase about her favorite recipes and watched her eyes light up as she recalled a butter cake of her youth. It was a pound cake made with confectioners' sugar, which somehow turns the cake's crust tender and crisp. It was a splurge for her family to bake when she was young, Mrs. Chase recalls. And it was one that her mother baked for Christmas.

Leah Chase's Butter Cake

Ingredients
1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, chilled but soft to the touch
1 pound powdered sugar
6 large eggs, at room temperature
2 2/3 cups cake flour, sifted once after measuring
1/2 teaspoon salt, if desired
2 teaspoons vanilla

Instructions
Place a rack in the center of the oven, and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10-inch tube pan with vegetable shortening or soft butter, and dust with flour. Shake out the excess flour and set the pan aside. (If the eggs are straight from the refrigerator, place them in a large bowl of warm water to come to room temperature).

Cut the sticks of butter into 6 to 8 tablespoons each, and place all the butter in the bowl of an electric mixer. Beat on medium-high until the butter is in one mass, 1 minute. Stop the mixer and add the powdered sugar. Drape a kitchen towel over the top of the mixer so you don't get showered with sugar. Start on low speed and blend the sugar to incorporate. Then increase the speed to medium and let the mixture beat until creamy, 2 to 3 minutes.

Crack one egg at a time and add to the butter mixture, beating on medium-low until blended. Add another egg, beating again, and stop the machine after every two eggs are added, and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Repeat with the remaining eggs.

With the machine off, add the flour to the mixture. Add salt, if desired. Mix on low speed to incorporate the flour, 30 seconds. Add the vanilla, and on low speed blend 15 seconds more.

Scrape down the sides of the bowl with the spatula, and turn the batter into the prepared pan, smoothing the top. Place the pan in the oven.

Bake until the cake is well browned and the center springs back to the touch, 58 to 62 minutes. A toothpick inserted should come out clean. Remove the cake from the oven, and let it cool in the pan for 20 minutes. Then run a knife around the edges, shake the pan gently to loosen the cake, and turn it out once, then again onto a rack to cool right-side up. Let cool 30 minutes to 1 hour before slicing.

It is a recipe filled with love and history, perfect for spring and summer entertaining no matter where you live. And it marries well with fresh local strawberries and summer's peaches. When I bake it, the smell, taste and sight of it all take me back to that day in New Orleans, conversing with a legendary Southern lady in her restaurant's kitchen, where the sounds from the fryer blend with stories of the past, and culinary diplomacy still reigns.

*Photo of Leah Chase by Blake Nelson Boyd via Wikimedia Commons
*Photo of Leah and "Dooky" Chase with President Bush at Dooky Chase's Restaurant in New Orleans: Public Domain


Cook a taste of New Orleans in your kitchen

Shrimp remoulade is a classic New Orleans cold appetizer made of boiled shrimp topped with a spicy sauce made with ketchup, mustard, horseradish, paprika, Worcestershire sauce and parsley.

sbossert, Contributor / Getty Images Show More Show Less

Charbroiled oysters at the iconic Drago's in New Orleans.

Christopher Moore, Contributor / Flickr Vision Show More Show Less

Willie Mae’s Scotch House’s Macaroni and Cheese

A tableside Bananas Foster in the making at Brennan's of Houston.

Brennan's of Houston, photographer Show More Show Less

Bananas Foster was invented at Brennan's Restaurant in New Orleans in 1951.

Hotel Monteleone’s Vieux Carré cocktail

The famous Carousel Bar in Hotel Monteleone on Royal Street is the birthplace of the Vieux Carré cocktail.

Tim Graham, Contributor / Getty Images Show More Show Less

Charbroiled oysters were invented at the New Orleans restaurant Drago's Seafood Restaurant in the early 1990s.

The Washington Post, Contributor / The Washington Post via Getty Images Show More Show Less

Shrimp remoulade is a classic New Orleans cold appetizer made of boiled shrimp topped with a spicy sauce made with ketchup, mustard, horseradish, paprika, Worcestershire sauce and parsley.

sbossert, Contributor / Getty Images/iStockphoto Show More Show Less

Drago's Famous Charbroiled Oysters. (Photo by Bob Chamberlin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Bob Chamberlin, Contributor / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images Show More Show Less

Commander’s Palace’s New Orleans-Style Barbecue. Page E8.

Hotel Monteleone's Vieux Carré cocktail

Willie Mae's Scotch House’s Macaroni and Cheese

Bananas Foster at Brennan's in New Orleans

The COVID-19 outbreak has tossed summer travel plans into a whirring blender for many people. So we&rsquore kicking off a series that&rsquos a foodie&rsquos tour of America&rsquos great gustatory destinations.

Our first stop in the Crescent City includes six recipes for the classic flavors you&rsquod kick yourself for skipping if you did have a chance to actually travel there. In the coming weeks, we&rsquoll travel from our kitchens to Miami, California&rsquos Napa Valley and New England, with recipes from their iconic restaurants and bars.

Now when in New Orleans, it&rsquos entirely appropriate to start the adventure with an adult libation. We&rsquove skipped over the saccharine Bourbon Street hurricanes to find a more dignified libation at the famed rotating Carousel Bar inside the Hotel Monteleone deep in the heart of the city&rsquos French Quarter.

The Vieux Carré cocktail is an elegant mixture of the herbaceous liqueur Bénédictine, rye whiskey, cognac and sweet vermouth that then-head bartender Walter Bergeron debuted in 1938. More than eight decades later, this drink remains a classy reminder of New Orleans&rsquo outsize impact on American cocktail culture.

Want specialty items from Louisiana shipped directly to your door? Try these sources for the flavors you're craving.

Cajun Grocer: Whether it's alligator meat, filé powder or a special occasion turducken, this one-stop shop has nearly all of your Louisiana cravings. cajungrocer.com

Cajun Specialty Meats: Start here when you're looking for andouille or boudin sausage or tasso ham. cajunspecialtymeats.com

Central Grocery & Deli: Accept no substitutes when it comes to the olive salad from the place that invented the muffuletta sandwich. centralgrocery.com

Louisiana Crawfish Co.: If it's mudbugs you need, these folks have you covered. lacrawfish.com

Poupart Bakery: Get your King Cake fix year-round from this venerable bakery. poupartsbakery.com

Charbroiled oysters are a recent newcomer to the New Orleans culinary canon, invented at Drago&rsquos Seafood Restaurant in response to a health scare surrounding raw oysters in the early &rsquo90s. The irresistible mélange of butter, garlic and briny bivalves has become such a staple that Drago&rsquos now shucks and grills more than 900 dozen per day.

To re-create them at home, look for large Gulf oysters at seafood counters in area grocery stores. You&rsquoll likely want to invest in a sturdy shucking knife as well. There are plenty of YouTube videos to teach you what to do.

Gulf shrimp season is well underway, and New Orleans has a multitude of legendary recipes to make the most of that catch.

Shrimp remoulade, a dish of cold shrimp in a zippy sauce served over a bed of lettuce, is the most popular dish at Galatoire&rsquos, a French Quarter classic that&rsquos been in business since 1905. This refreshing preparation alongside a Sazerac cocktail at this long-standing lunch destination marks the early end of the workweek for much of the city&rsquos business community on Fridays.

New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp is a bit of a misnomer, having nothing to do with open flames or barbecue sauce, but it has become a must-have dish regardless of its misleading nomenclature. The restaurant Pascal&rsquos Manale, which invented the dish in the 1950s, will probably never cough up its secret recipe, but that hasn&rsquot stopped the dish from spreading across the city. Our version comes from the vaunted Commander&rsquos Palace, which has kept hungry patrons well-fed in the city&rsquos Garden District since 1893.

Of course, there&rsquos more than seafood to celebrate in New Orleans. Soul food has reigned at the Tremé-neighborhood staple Willie Mae&rsquos Scotch House since the family-owned business opened in 1957. While you&rsquore unlikely to ever get the exact recipe for late founder Willie Mae Seaton&rsquos famous fried chicken, the restaurant did recently share the recipe for its famous cayenne-laced mac and cheese to help sate the appetites of diners locked out during the pandemic.

New Orleans&rsquos most famous dessert is a flash in the pan &mdash literally.

The Brennan family of New Orleans launched a restaurant empire in 1946 with the eponymous Brennan&rsquos. The bananas Foster, a sticky flambéed concoction of bananas and rum, was developed in 1951 to showcase bananas, which came through the city&rsquos ports in large volume as America developed a taste for the tropical fruit.

It&rsquos since become the most-ordered dish at Brennan&rsquos &mdash a can&rsquot-miss classic perfect to end any Crescent City feast, whether you&rsquore there or cooking from the comfort and COVID-free safety of your home kitchen.


Roux Orleans: A taste of Louisiana for the New Orleans Lover in You

A journey of more than 1,000 miles, Pennsylvanians can travel to New Orleans for as low as $12 all thanks to authentic Creole and Cajun cuisines served at a local restaurant.

Roux Orleans is the Louisiana-inspired creation of Mike Barnes, who opened the eatery after receiving multiple impassioned requests from friends with a love for his home-cooking.

“I already had a culinary arts background so when I moved up here, people began trying my food and told me I should sell it,” said Barnes. “The food here is nothing like what I’m used to back home, with the seasonings and flavor, so I decided to bring it here to Pittsburgh.”

Patrons lucky enough to get a warm bite of seafood gumbo or jambalaya, are surely tasting family recipes and traditions going back generations.

Barnes’ love for food was born long before he began a 20-year career in the restaurant industry. The New Orleans native says his earliest memories of creating delicious meals are cooking with his grandmother and mother.

Success has come quickly for Roux Orleans, which only opened a mere four years ago. Barnes says that fans of the restaurant come back to experience a culture that isn’t fully captured anywhere else in the state.

“We have people who have been to New Orleans before and have tried the food and enjoyed it, but they couldn’t get that same environment or culture here in Pittsburgh from any of the other businesses that offer Cajun or Creole-style cuisines,” said Barnes, who gets his ingredients directly from The Big Easy.

Classic New Orleans-style meals cover the menu from top to bottom. Described as a “full-blown taste of New Orleans”, Barnes says Pennsylvanians and visitors alike will get the chance to experience everything he grew up eating from po boy sandwiches to beignets.

Aside from in-person dining, Roux Orleans also offers catering services to those who want a taste of Cajun or Creole dishes at their event.


A taste of New Orleans

Buy Photo

Shrimp Creole is among the New Orleans dishes Paul Verneuille’s Southern Creole Cuisine has weekly at the Mississippi Farmer’s Market. (Photo: Joe Ellis/The Clarion-Ledger ) Buy Photo

Savor the flavor. It’s the sort of taste you can draw a bead on. And, as Mardi Gras nears, your taste buds are likely itching to.

Red beans and rice, gumbo, muffalettas, Shrimp Creole and more call to mind all those robust flavors that dance down the streets of New Orleans to a second line beat and jazz up a dinner plate big-time.

Paul Verneuille’s Southern Creole Cuisine, a Mississippi Farmer’s Market fixture, cooks up such Crescent City classics, plus more for a selection that each Saturday includes a hot main dish, a hot soup (or in summer, a cold salad) and a variety of prepared frozen dishes, soups and breads.

New Orleans-style white beans and rice, a dish from his childhood, was this past weekend’s hot pick, using Camellia brand white beans as the base.

“It’s a New Orleans product, and it really cooks different,” Verneuille said of the Camellia brand of beans, available locally at Mac’s Fresh Market in Ridgeland and McDade’s Markets in Jackson.

“My family ate a lot of it,” he said of the hearty dish that also includes bits of ham and circles of sliced sausage that he pointed out as the Mississippi product, Country Pleasin’ smoked sausage.

With other ingredients for his dishes, “I buy as much from the farmers as I possibly can,” he said, such as greens for his turnip greens soup, so he can share that information with customers.

The substitution of red kidney beans can easily translate the white beans and rice to the more widely known red beans and rice.

A self-taught cook guided by his parents’ influence — his dad with French heritage and a touch of German, and his mother, Swedish and English — Verneuille was a sixth-generation New Orleans resident before moving to Mississippi in 1997. His culinary background also includes work as a saucier at Arnaud’s in New Orleans and ownership of a small Italian po-boy shop called Zia, also in New Orleans.

A licensed caterer, Verneuille is starting his fourth year at the Mississippi Farmer’s Market, anchoring the southwest corner with a tent, tiny white lights and a red, white and blue tablecloth. His “mini muffs” — slider-sized muffalettas — are popular pickups for walk-around, or take-home snacking. The larger muffaletta can feed four. Comfort food staples, including shepherd’s pie and chicken and dumplings (Verneuille’s own grandmother’s recipe) are popular, too.

Long-time customer C.B. Carroll said, “I just love everything he makes, especially his gumbo and his shepherd’s pie.” So much so, the pairing made his catered family Christmas party. “He asked what I’d like, and the two things were shepherd’s pie and gumbo. I know that doesn’t sound like traditional Christmas fare, but it was a hit.”

With Verneuille’s frozen breads — crawfish, shrimp, spinach and cheese and sausage and cheese — the stuffing is wrapped in raw dough that customers can thaw for several hours, let rise (instructions included), stick in the oven “and have fresh, hot bread he or she baked.”

The thaw, heat and serve action, for frozen entrees too, has a fan in Nora Frances McRae, who finds dishes such as the frozen Shrimp Creole or Crawfish Etouffee easy to box and take with her to a vacation home in Tennessee. “The New Orleans influence is too remote and accessibility to seafood makes it more challenging,” McRae said. “People just go wild over it, and I get all the thanks. And try to give him the credit.”

This Saturday, Verneuille plans have the crawfish sausage he sells by the link on a stick. It’s a combination of Louisiana crawfish tails and fresh Mississippi pork shoulder. And he’ll let the good times roll with jambalaya along with broccoli and cheese soup.

His Southern Creole Cuisine name reflects the culinary influences at play, as he pulls from Southern and New Orleans traditions.

“I get people, who ask me, did you ever do this?” and suggest a dish he said. “Mostly, it’s their mom’s or grandmother’s recipe. I try to take that Mississippi recipe . and I might bring up the seasoning,” The name, he said, “epitomizes Southern food that has been ‘Creole-ized.’ It just seemed to fit what I do.”

New Orleans-style White Beans (or Red Kidney Beans)

1 pound smoked sausage (Country Pleasin’ brand)

½ cup chopped green onion (for garnish, do not cook)

¼ cup chopped parsley (for garnish, do not cook)

¼ teaspoon Zatarain’s liquid crab boil

Soak beans overnight in water. Next day, drain and cover beans with fresh water about 1 inch over beans. Bring to a boil and reduce heat. Let simmer for 1½ hours. Add water when necessary. Saute vegetables in ¼ cup fat (he likes to use bacon grease because it has so much flavor, but you could also use oil or butter) until soft, about 7 to 10 minutes. Add vegetables to beans. Add hambone. Cut sausage into ¼-inch round pieces. Saute sausage, drain the grease and add the sausage to the beans. Cook for another hour on low heat. Beans should be tender and creamy. Remove bay leaves before serving. Serve over rice. Garnish with chopped green onions and parsley.

Source: Southern Creole Cuisine

3 pounds peeled and deveined shrimp (18- to 26-count size)

4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 bunch green onions (cut to ¼-inch rings for garnish, do not cook)

¼ cup chopped parsley (for garnish, do not cook)

4 to 6 cups of stock (make stock by boiling shrimp shells with salt and pepper)

Heat ¼ cup fat (he prefers bacon grease) in a large stock pot. Saute all chopped vegetables. Add salt, black pepper and a small amount of cayenne pepper along with ¼ teaspoon Zatarain’s liquid crab boil. Make your roux. Add hot roux and tomato paste to hot vegetables and cook 10 minutes. Slowly begin adding stock until your consistency is where you would like it to be (about the consistency of a heavy gravy).

Cook 10 more minutes on medium heat. Add raw shrimp and cook an additional 10 minutes. Serve over rice. Garnish with chopped green onions and parsley. Recipe serves 10.

Source: Southern Creole Cuisine

One heavy pot (black cast-iron preferred)

Heat empty pan on stove until very hot. Add oil and let it get very hot. Add flour and stir with a whisk or wooden spoon until it begins to turn a medium brown and begins to solidify. This should take about 7 to 10 minutes. Do NOT leave this process. Keep it moving or it will begin to burn!

This mixture is going to be very hot, so be extremely careful when adding this to your dishes. Always put cold product in the hot roux or hot roux into hot mixture. Never put hot roux into a cold mixture!


Strawberry & Cream Croissant French Toast For Your Weekend Brunch

Those with a creative eye know firsthand that inspiration is all around us. Whether you're energized by the earth tones of nature, a color-filled walk through a local farmer's market, or even by a quick scroll through Instagram, you never know what might spark a new creative project.

In the spirit of inspiring your next masterpiece, we're excited to partner with Bounty to fuel the next generation of artists and designers forward by launching a national design competition. We're calling on graphic designers to apply for a chance to see their work featured on a new Brit + Co and Bounty paper towel collection, set to launch in 2022.

Aside from the incredible exposure of having your illustrations on paper towels that'll be in stores across America next year, you'll also receive $5,000 for your art a scholarship for Selfmade, our 10-week entrepreneurship accelerator to take your design career to the next level (valued at $2,000) and a stand alone feature on Brit + Co spotlighting your artistry as a creator.

The Creatively You Design Competition launches Friday, May 21, 2021 and will be accepting submissions through Monday, June 7, 2021.

APPLY NOW

Who Should Apply: Women-identifying graphic designers and illustrators. (Due to medium limitations, we're not currently accepting design submissions from photographers or painters.)

What We're Looking For: Digital print and pattern designs that reflect your design aesthetic. Think optimistic, hopeful, bright — something you'd want to see inside your home.

How To Enter: Apply here, where you'll be asked to submit 2x original design files you own the rights to for consideration. Acceptable file formats include: .PNG, .JPG, .GIF, .SVG, .PSD, and .TIFF. Max file size 5GB. We'll also ask about your design inspiration and your personal info so we can keep in touch.

Artist Selection Process: Panelists from Brit + Co and P&G Bounty's creative teams will judge the submissions and select 50 finalists on June 11, 2021 who will receive a Selfmade scholarship for our summer 2021 session. Then, up to 8 artists will be selected from the finalists and notified on June 18, 2021. The chosen designers will be announced publicly in 2022 ahead of the product launch.

For any outstanding contest Qs, please see our main competition page. Good luck & happy creating!


Cook a taste of New Orleans from your kitchen, with Commander's Palace barbecue shrimp, bananas Foster, Galatoire's shrimp remoulade and more

Shrimp remoulade is a classic New Orleans cold appetizer made of boiled shrimp topped with a spicy sauce made with ketchup, mustard, horseradish, paprika, Worcestershire sauce and parsley.

Charbroiled oysters at the iconic Drago's in New Orleans.

Christopher Moore /Flickr Vision Show More Show Less

Willie Mae’s Scotch House’s Macaroni and Cheese

A tableside Bananas Foster in the making at Brennan's of Houston.

The Bananas Foster was invented at Brennan's Restaurant in New Orleans in 1951.

Hotel Monteleone’s Vieux Carré cocktail

The famous Carousel Bar in Hotel Monteleone on Royal Street is the birthplace of the Vieux Carré cocktail.

Charbroiled oysters were invented at the New Orleans restaurant Drago's Seafood Restaurant in the early 1990s.

The Washington Post /The Washington Post via Getty Images Show More Show Less

Shrimp remoulade is a classic New Orleans cold appetizer made of boiled shrimp topped with a spicy sauce made with ketchup, mustard, horseradish, paprika, Worcestershire sauce and parsley.

sbossert /Getty Images /iStockphoto Show More Show Less

Drago's Famous Charbroiled Oysters. (Photo by Bob Chamberlin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Bob Chamberlin, Contributor / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images Show More Show Less

Commander’s Palace’s New Orleans-Style Barbecue Shrimp

Hotel Monteleone's Vieux Carré cocktail

Willie Mae's Scotch House’s Macaroni and Cheese

Bananas Foster at Brennan's in New Orleans

Bourbon Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Our kickoff stop in the Crescent City includes six recipes for the classic flavors you’d kick yourself for skipping if you did have a chance to actually travel there.

John Coletti /Getty Images Show More Show Less

Bourbon Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Our kickoff stop in the Crescent City includes six recipes for the classic flavors you’d kick yourself for skipping if you did have a chance to actually travel there.

Bruce Yuanyue Bi /Getty Images Show More Show Less

Saint Louis Cathedral on Jackson Square. Our kickoff stop in the Crescent City includes six recipes for the classic flavors you’d kick yourself for skipping if you did have a chance to actually travel there.

Our kickoff stop in the Crescent City includes six recipes for the classic flavors you’d kick yourself for skipping if you did have a chance to actually travel there.

Daniel Grill /Getty Images / Tetra images RF Show More Show Less

The COVID-19 outbreak has tossed summer travel plans into a whirring blender for many. So this week we&rsquore kicking off a four-week series that&rsquos a foodie&rsquos tour of America&rsquos great gustatory destinations.

Our kickoff stop in the Crescent City includes six recipes for the classic flavors you&rsquod kick yourself for skipping if you did have a chance to actually travel there. In the coming weeks, we&rsquoll travel from our kitchens to Miami, California&rsquos Napa Valley and New England, with recipes from their iconic restaurants and bars.

Now when in New Orleans, it&rsquos entirely appropriate to start the adventure with an adult libation. We&rsquove skipped over the saccharine Bourbon Street hurricanes to find a more dignified libation at the famed rotating Carousel Bar inside the Hotel Monteleone deep in the heart of the city&rsquos French Quarter.

The Vieux Carré cocktail is an elegant mixture of the herbaceous liqueur Bénédictine, rye whiskey, cognac and sweet vermouth that then-head bartender Walter Bergeron debuted in 1938. More than eight decades later this drink remains a classy reminder of New Orleans&rsquo outsize impact on American cocktail culture.

Charbroiled oysters are a recent newcomer to the New Orleans culinary canon, invented at Drago&rsquos Seafood Restaurant in response to a health scare surrounding raw oysters in the early &rsquo90s. The irresistible melange of butter, garlic and briny bivalves has become such a staple that Drago&rsquos now shucks and grills more than 900 dozen per day.

To re-create them at home, look for large Gulf oysters at seafood counters in area grocery stores. You&rsquoll likely want to invest in a sturdy shucking knife as well. There are plenty of YouTube videos to teach you what to do, and you can find both the oysters and knife at Groomers Seafood at 9801 McCullough Ave.

Gulf shrimp season is well underway, and New Orleans has a multitude of legendary recipes to make the most of that catch.

Shrimp remoulade, a dish of cold shrimp in a zippy sauce served over a bed of lettuce, is the most popular dish at Galatoire&rsquos, a French Quarter classic that&rsquos been in business since 1905. This refreshing preparation alongside a Sazerac cocktail at this longstanding lunch destination marks the early end of the workweek for much of the city&rsquos business community on Fridays.

New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp is a bit of a misnomer, having nothing to do with open flames or barbecue sauce, but it has become a must-have dish regardless of the misleading nomenclature. The restaurant Pascal&rsquos Manale, which invented the dish in the 1950s, will probably never cough up their secret recipe, but that hasn&rsquot stopped the dish from spreading across the city. Our version comes from the vaunted Commander&rsquos Palace, which has kept hungry patrons well fed in the city&rsquos Garden District since 1893.

Want specialty items from Louisiana shipped directly to your door? Try these sources for the flavors you're craving.

Cajun Grocer: Whether it's alligator meat, filé powder or a special occasion turducken, this one-stop shop has nearly all of your Louisiana cravings. cajungrocer.com

Cajun Specialty Meats: Start here when you're looking for anduille or boudin sausage or tasso ham. cajunspecialtymeats.com

Central Grocery & Deli: Accept no substitutes when it comes to the olive salad from the place that invented the muffuletta sandwich. centralgrocery.com

Louisiana Crawfish Co.: If it's mudbugs you need, these folks have you covered. lacrawfish.com

Poupart Bakery: Get your King Cake fix year-round from this venerable bakery. poupartsbakery.com

Of course, there&rsquos more than seafood to celebrate in New Orleans. Soul food has reigned at the Tremé-neighborhood staple Willie Mae&rsquos Scotch House since the family-owned business opened in 1957. While you&rsquore unlikely to ever get the exact recipe for late founder Willie Mae Seaton&rsquos famous fried chicken, the restaurant did recently share the recipe for its famous cayenne-laced mac and cheese to help sate the appetites of diners locked out during the pandemic.

New Orleans&rsquos most famous dessert is a flash in the pan &mdash literally.

The Brennan family of New Orleans launched a restaurant empire in 1946 with the eponymous Brennan&rsquos. The bananas Foster, a sticky flambéed concoction of bananas and rum, was developed in 1951 to showcase bananas, which came through the city&rsquos ports in large volume as America developed a taste for the tropical fruit.

It&rsquos since become the most-ordered dish at Brennan&rsquos &mdash a can&rsquot-miss classic perfect to end any Crescent City feast, whether you&rsquore there or cooking from the comfort and COVID-free safety of your home kitchen.


Red Beans and Rice

2 onions, diced
1 green pepper, seeded and diced
1 rib celery, diced
2 tablespoons rendered bacon fat or other flavorful fat such as duck fat or olive oil
1 pound dried red kidney beans
2 smoked ham hocks
3 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
3 green onions, chopped
Salt and pepper
Vinegar-based hot sauce, such as Tabasco or Crystal
4 cups cooked Basic Louisiana White Rice, see recipe

1. Sweat the onions, bell peppers and celery in the rendered bacon fat in a heavy soup pot over medium-high heat.

2. Once the onions become translucent, add the kidney beans, ham hocks, bay leaves and cayenne, then add water to cover by 2 inches.

3. Increase the heat and bring the water to a boil. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to low, and allow the beans to slowly simmer for 2 hours. Periodically stir the beans to make sure they don’t scorch on the bottom of the pot, adding water if necessary, always keeping the beans covered by 1 inch or more of water.

4. Continue cooking the beans until they are creamy and beginning to fall apart when they’re served.

5. Remove the ham hock meat from the bones, roughly chop it and add it back to the pot of beans.

6. Stir in the green onions and season heavily with salt (beans need a lot of salt), black pepper and hot sauce. Serve with white rice. Serves 8.

Recipe from “My New Orleans: The Cookbook” by John Besh.

Per serving: 246 calories 8 g fat 2 g saturated fat 8 mg cholesterol 8 g protein 35 g carbohydrate 2 g sugar 5 g fiber 491 mg sodium 56 mg calcium


Thursday, July 21, 2005

Interview with Chef Eirich at Galatoire's Restaurant in New Orleans

Welcome to New Orleans Recipes.

Chef Ross gave me two recipes. One for Shrimp Remoulade which serves 6 and the other for Oysters Rockefeller which serves 12. You can download the Oysters Rockefeller as a pdf file here. I hope to have the Shrimp Remoulade posted tomorrow.

Thanks and I hope you enjoy the blog, the recipes and the interview.

If you have any questions, recipes or comments we would love to hear from you.

Oysters Rockefeller
6 dozen oysters (on the half shell)
12 cups of rock salt
12 lemon wedges
Sauce Ingredients:
1 cup leeks
1 cup fennel
1/2 cup finely chopped parsley
1/3 cup finely chopped green onions
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup ketchup
3 cups chopped spinach
(defrosted and drained)
1/2 tsp. salt
pinch of cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp. white pepper
pinch of thyme
1 tsp. ground anise
1 Tbsp. red wine vinegar
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
3 Tbsp. Herbsaint
(may substitute Pernod)
1 cup melted butter
1 cup seasoned breadcrumbs

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
To make the Rockefeller sauce: in a food processor combine all sauce ingredients except the butter and breadcrumbs. Puree. Transfer to a mixing bowl then add butter and fold in breadcrumbs, blending well.
Arrange twelve 8-in. cake pans fill each with rock salt to cover bottoms. Arrange 6 oysters in each pan. Fill a pastry bag with Rockefeller sauce. Pipe equal portions of sauce over each shell (if you do not have a pastry bag, use a spoon). Place in the oven and bake for 5 minutes. Then broil for 3-1/2 minutes until top is bubbling.
Remove and transfer pans to napkin-covered serving plates. Garnish with lemon wedges.


Watch the video: a taste of new orleans (July 2022).


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