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Strangest Food and Drink Moments with the Stanley Cup Slideshow

Strangest Food and Drink Moments with the Stanley Cup Slideshow


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Erik Cole: Applejacks

According to the Stanley Cup Journal, Erik Cole of the Carolina Hurricanes let his children Bella and Landon eat their Applejacks out of the Stanley Cup.

Sean O'Donnell: Dog Food

According to the Hall of Fame, Sean O'Donnell of the Anaheim Ducks served his black Labrador Retriever "Buddy" a meal out in the Stanley Cup in 2007.

Reuters reported that his teammate, goalie Jean-Sebastien Giguere did the same thing. Not really very original — ABC reported that in 1980, New York Islander Clark Gillies did it too.

Montreal Wanderers: Gum

According to ABC, in the early 1900s one of the Montreal Wanderers — who also operated a bowling alley — used the Stanley Cup to hold gum and cigars in a trophy case there.

Tomas Holmstrom: Pitepalt

After winning the Stanley Cup in 2008, Tomas Holmstrom of the Detroit Red Wings brought the trophy to his hometown Piteå in Sweden that summer, where it was used in the baptism of his niece... and also as a serving dish for pitepalt, Swedish stuffed potato dumplings.

Martin Brodeur: Popcorn

After winning the Stanley Cup in 2003, New Jersey Devil's goalie Martin Brodeur supposedly took it to the movies so his kids could eat popcorn out of it.

Ed Olczyk: Oats

It's commonly accepted on the Interwebs that New York Ranger Ed Olczyk took the Stanley Cup to the Belmont racetrack and let Kentucky Derby winner Go for Gin use it as a feed bag. Not so fast reports the Hockey Hall of Fame: "That's not true," Eddie says. "I took the Cup to the Meadowlands one night and to Belmont Park the next day. I saw Go For Gin in the winner's circle, but no horse ate out of the Cup while it was with me."

Brian Noonan and Nick Kypreos: Raw Clams and Oysters

After 54 years without having won the Stanley Cup and hearing all those "1940" chants, there was some steam to blow off. Thus the crazy stories associated with the 1994 Rangers. Sports Illustrated reported that Brian Noonan and Nick Kypreos brought the Cup on MTV Prime Time Beach House where it was dressed in a T-shirt, baseball cap, and false mustache, then stuffed with raw clams and oysters.

Patrick Kane: Chicken Wings

Reuters reported that Patrick Kane of the Chicago Blackhawks celebrated winning in 2010 by loading the Stanley Cup with greasy chicken wings.

Tripe Soup

While he didn't specify where, when, how, or who did it, Reuters' Frank Pingue did report that the Stanley Cup had been used as a bowl for "soup made from cows' intestines."

A Coffee Urn?

The curator of the Hockey Hall of Fame, Phil Pritchard, related a bizarre encounter to Reuters of being at a celebrity golf tournament when a woman mistook the Stanley Cup for a coffee urn. A coffee urn?

Annals of Drinking

Champagne, beer, wine, you name it. Players, celebrities, and revelers who happen across the Cup celebrate by drinking alcohol out of it. You'd take a few gulps too if you came across players partying with it. You've got to think after all, that's how it ended up at the bottom of Mario Lemieux's swimming pool in 1991, right?

Consider though, the cup has also supposedly been used as a chamber pot on several occasions. Once in 1940, when supposedly, Ranger Hall of Famer Lynn Patrick and teammates urinated on it. And The Star reported that Detroit Red Wing veteran Kris Draper's diaperless newborn daughter did exactly what you'd expect a diaperless baby would do in it:

"A week after we won it, I had my newborn daughter in there and she pooped in the Cup," said Draper. "That was something. We had a pretty good laugh. It was, well, clean it out. I still drank out of it that night, so no worries."


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


What are some of the best answers on Quora?

Could be the most brilliant, detailed, enlightening, greatest, best source, smartest, wittiest, mind blowing, simple, crazy, touching. In short, answers that makes you say wow. this should be on the all time top answers list of Quora.

Answer Wiki

List is still incomplete. Please don't forget to not notify question followers

  • Willem Schuddeboom's answer to What is the most useless battle?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How does it feel to be extremely poor?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are some good ways to get revenge on someone?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to How can I become fluent in English?
  • Suvarna Khanal's answer to Who is the luckiest person on Earth?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What are important things and advice to know that people generally aren't told about?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to Can some one give real life example to understand access specifiers in JAVA?
  • Aniruddh Chaturvedi's answer to What facts about the United States do foreigners not believe until they come to America?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the best thing someone ever wrote for you?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people supporting Narendra Modi choose to ignore his alleged role in the Gujarat riots?
  • Anonymous' answer to What is it like to be a drug dealer?
  • Anonymous' answer to What does it feel like to have the top answer on a question (for a long time), only to just get a notification that a Quora power user has just answered it?
  • Anonymous' answer to Why do people cheat on their partners?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  • Ariel Williams' answer to Could we ever make a real lightsaber?
  • Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?
  • How does a star engineering high school senior choose among Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Caltech, Stanford and Harvard?
  • Why is Dropbox more popular than other programs with similar functionality?
  • Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  • Jon Davis' answer to Military Strategy: What are the optimal siege tactics for taking Magic Kingdom's Cinderella Castle?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most charming small towns in France?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is it like to be raised by an Indian father?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the some unique hotels in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful private residences in the world?
  • Julien Vaché's answer to What are the most beautiful coral reefs in the world?
  • Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  • Michael Wolfe's answer to Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3?
  • Oliver Starr's answer to Animal Behavior: Would a lone adult wolf be able to take down an unarmed, athletic adult human?
  • Is Amy Chua right when she explains "Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal?
  • Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  • Have I have fallen in love with Python because she is beautiful?
  • Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  • Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  • What is it like to be a stripper?
  • Subhrajyoti Ghatak's answer to What are the most gripping stories in human history?
  • Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  • Pritam Kumar's answer to What is the biggest misconception people have about life?
  • Tommy Winfrey's answer to What does it feel like to murder someone?
  • William Chen's answer to What are the advantages of having a low GPA?

Here all the answers I have bookmarked, which is the highest accolade one can bestow upon an answer imho:

  1. Kiran Kadav's answer to Why are petrol prices rising in India?
  2. Tim O'Neill's answer to What is the real reason the United States waged war against Iraq?
  3. Tomasz Zurek's answer to What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative easing?
  4. Som Bhatta's answer to Why do all good things come to an end?
  5. Jay Wacker's answer to If I want to look smart, what do I need to know about the Higgs Boson discovery?
  6. Paul King's answer to How does the human brain decide which memories to store?
  7. Quora User's answer to What aspects of Scientology are cult-like? Is Scientology a cult or a religion? Or just Fake?
  8. Ariel Williams' answer to What religion is the fictional DC Comics male character Bruce Wayne (Batman)?
  9. Bryce Johannes pointed me in the direction of this epic answer: Quora User's answer to Humpty Dumpty: We don't know much about his life, except that it ends quite tragically. What better ending can you come up with?
  10. Bryce Johannes' answer to Who was the nicest American President?

I've clearly left out a number of other epic answers, I'll add more to this list when I find them. Suggestions are more than welcome.

Related Questions

I've been working on this post for a few months now, so it's a long list. It was very time consuming, but I learnt a lot in the process, and I'm hoping it'd help some other Quorans learn more from Quora in less time.

See the content title and use Ctrl+F to find it and then navigate- that'd be easier.

PS: I've learnt a lot from here this is just my way of trying to return the favour.

1. Previously made lists
2. Layman's terms - Part 1
3. Layman's terms - Part2
4. What should everyone know about X?
5. What does it feel like to X? - Part 1
6. What does it feel like to X? - Part 2
7. Is it informative in here, or is it just them?
8. Marcus Geduld on life, psychology and learning
9. Introducing- The Engel Series
10. The Engel Series Part 2
11. The Engel Series Part 3
12. The Engel Series Part 4
13. The Engel Series Part 5
14. Universe in a glass of wine
15. Cosmology
16. Evolution
17. What is the evolutionary purpose/advantage of X? And related questions.
18. Ethics, science, theism, atheism and psychology
19. Q&A about Life
20. Literature and Art
21. Anders Kaserog on Mathematics
22. Children and Parenting
23. Fruits, Food and Nutrition
24. Restaurants, cooking, recipes and cuisines
25. Travelling and Tourist Destinations
26. General Sports, Football, Cricket and Chess
27. Education and learning
28. Silicon Valley and entrepreneurship
29. Neuroscience, Aging, Death and Dying
30. Humour, Jokes, Memes and Joke Answers
31. Statistics by Stormy Shippy- Real name, really!

There's so much we can learn from this topic- it is one of my favourites.

Some stories about the darker side of life and stories of some people who rose above it.

I'll start this one with Hartmann.

There are a LOT of such questions and all of them in one post will just be too much, so I won't post them all. I'll now end with a few which will be comparatively lighter to read-

Too much info from Murtaza:

And lastly, Joshua uses his magnificent brain to solve an important problem of the day-

This is the last part of "The Engel Series". Joshua has written 6103 answers till now, so I must've missed quite a few good ones since I've chosen only 100 of them. I learnt a lot while making this series and the process was worth the effort. There are enough people doing awesome stuff and writing amazing answers in here- we just need to find them. And I've realized this job is not very cumbersome despite what our feeds make us believe.

Humans are a curious species. We wonder, seek answers. We worry about how nature is, and why is it the way it is. Most of us do not usually spend our time worrying about these questions, but almost all of us worry about them some of the time.

The result of this curious nature of human beings was that we started the quest for understanding the nature of nature. In the process, we divided nature into parts, and those parts into sub-parts. But as Feynman once said, "If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!"- in the next series of posts, we'll try to do exactly that. It's obviously not going to portray the complete picture, but let's see how far we can go if we proceed along that path, and try to connect those parts here, on Quora.

Most of the selected answers in any topic will be from Quorans who have established their credibility as a good source of information in that particular field.

The series will start with Cosmology - explaining the multiverse theory, why nature follows a particular set of laws, origin of the universe, space-time and the predicted fate of the universe. It will also include the reasons behind why so many scientists say that a creator isn't a necessity for the universe to be the way it is.

The next topic will be Evolution - it will include the basics of evolution and natural selection, common misconceptions, evolution and creationism - their incompatibility, facts, what we know about the origin of life, whether life could originate without any supernatural interference and the origins of selfless/altruistic behaviour..

Then we'll go to Theism and Ethics, addressing questions such as - do we really need to read a book to realize that murder is wrong? Will we accept slavery if a scripture says it is acceptable or is it that moral behaviour has become a part of us over the course of human evolution? Why do humans behave ethically what exactly is ethical? What kind of morality do we strive for? Does scripture represent absolute morality, or should we strive for a morality that is thought out, reasoned, argued, discussed, and based upon what you could almost call. an intelligent design?

After this comes Theism and Psychology, where we'll discuss the benefits of being a believer, why tolerance is a good thing that every atheist and theist should have for each other, the exceptions to the tolerance rule, and why it is usually best to do nothing and simply walk away when the rule is being violated in, say, an internet discussion forum.

Then there'll be Q&A about Life, that'll answer questions like -What is life? What is the purpose of living? Was I better off not knowing the answers? What should I do if I don't like the answers I've found? How can I maximize my happiness, make the best out of my life?

Lastly, we'll dip into the pool of Literature and Art -
A wise Quoran once told me that in the end, you have to remember that at your core, you're an emotional organism rather than a reasoning one. Most of what your brain does isn't all that much different from that of a cat, which is actually quite a lot. We have something very special on top, a reasoning skill, but it's not actually all that good: even simple arithmetic is a dicey proposition. The real win is in language, which crosses the boundary, using a purely symbolic mode to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We can extricate all kinds of emotions from those symbols, but they are diminished by it: you've lost a key portion of what they mean. It's good for certain very specific kinds of decisions, but a lot of what makes life enjoyable is in what you lose. Including the very notion of "enjoyment".

We'll look at language as a powerful tool that has the potential to affect us at the deepest, intuitive levels. We'll learn the basics of appreciating art and learn that art and science are just two different ways of portraying nature - branches of the same tree, parts of the same glass of wine. We'll realize that neither is superior, neither is inferior. Both are necessary. And it is then, that we'll be able to mix it all together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all!

Jay Wacker- Former professor of Physics at of Stanford. His field of research is in theoretical Particle Physics and his research is focused on Large Hadron Collider and Dark Matter.
Frank Heile- Did his PhD in particle physics at Stanford after doing undergraduate physics at MIT
Robert Frost- Instructor/trainer at NASA. Trains astronauts and flight controllers for a living.
Leo C. Stein: NASA Einstein postdoctoral fellow. Studies Gravity and General Relativity at Cornell. Got his Ph.D. from MIT in Physics and did his undergrad in physics at Caltech

The Multiverse Theory:

Wiki's intro to various theories

The multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of infinite or finite possible universes that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter, and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. The various universes within the multiverse are sometimes called parallel universes.
Multiverse contains universes with every possible set of laws, but only the ones with mutually compatible set of laws can give rise to universes stable enough to cause beings like us to evolve and ask such questions. There is a theory of cosmological natural selection which surmises that a collapsing black hole causes the emergence of a new universe on the "other side", whose fundamental constant parameters may differ slightly from those of the universe where the black hole collapsed. Each universe thus gives rise to as many new universes as it has black holes. Universes reproduce in a way analogous to hydra undergoing budding. The theory contains the evolutionary ideas of "reproduction" and "mutation" of universes, and so is formally analogous to models of population biology. Universes that have mutually compatible set of laws can survive long enough to develop conditions in which beings like us can exist, and therefore, it is no miracle that we find ourselves in such a universe: had it not been this way (or a way similar to it), we would not have been there to see it. Mathematical models of universes that'd have laws different from our own universe (and can still form stable universes) are currently being made.

(What you read in this paragraph are mostly hypothetical theories with little evidence. They were a good way to start and give you the feel of the subject before we turn to the experts and that's way they were chosen.)

Now, we are ready to read proper answers.

Wherever possible, they have been ordered in a way that in some sense, one leads to another. They haven't been arranged according to popularity or number of upvotes though.


Watch the video: The Best Of Stanley - The Office US (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Zulkiktilar

    I apologize, but in my opinion you admit the mistake. I can defend my position.

  2. Eldrian

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  3. Novak

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  4. Mezishakar

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  5. Ahanu

    that ultimately?

  6. Sashicage

    Wow :) How great!

  7. Odwolfe

    Timely argument



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